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Raid Manager

February 29, 2012

Raid Manager 6.22 and A1000 config

Config and setup

Firstly install the Raid manager 6.22 (6.221) software on the Solaris 8 system.

        # pkgadd -d . SUNWosar SUNWosafw SUNWosamn SUNWosau

Defending upon your raid manager version and  scsi/fibre card type you will need to patch the system. The following patches are recommended for Solaris 8.
 
Solaris 8 & Raid manager 6.22 108553-07
108982-09
111085-02
Solaris 8 & Raid manager 6.221 112125-01
108982-09
111085-02
Ultra 60 106455-09
Fibre channel card 109571-02
 

It is probably worth giving the system a reconfigure reboot at this stage.
 

Firmware

The first thing to do is check the firmware of the A1000. This can be done with the raidutil command. ( I assume the A1000 is on controller 1. If not then change the controller as appropriate.

        # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -i

If the returned values are less that those shown below you will have to upgrade the firmware using fwutil.

        Product        Revision  0301
        Boot Level        03.01.03.04
        Boot Level Date   07/06/00
        Firmware Level    03.01.03.60
        Firmware Date     06/30/00

To upgrade the firmware perform the following.

        # cd /usr/lib/osa/fw
        # fwutil 02050632.bwd c1t0d0
        # fwutil 02050632.apd  c1t0d0
        # fwutil 03010233.bwd  c1t0d0
        # fwutil 03010235.apd  c1t0d0
        # fwutil 03010304.bwd  c1t0d0
        # fwutil 03010360.apd  c1t0d0

You can now re-perform the "raidutil -c c1todo -i" command again to verify the firmware changes.

Clean up the array

I am assuming that the array is free for full use by ourselves and intend to remove any old luns that might be lying around.

        # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -X
The above command resets the array internals.
We can now remove any old lun's.  To do this run "raidutil -c c1t0d0 -i" and note any luns that are configured.

To delete the luns perform the following command.
        # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -i
                       LUNs found on c1t0d0.
                       LUN 0    RAID 1    10 MB

                       Vendor ID         Symbios
                       ProductID         StorEDGE A1000
                       Product Revision  0301
                       Boot Level        03.01.03.04
                       Boot Level Date   07/06/00
                       Firmware Level    03.01.03.60
                       Firmware Date     06/30/00
                       raidutil succeeded!

        # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -D 0
In the above example we are removing lun 0.  repeat this command changing the lun number as appropriate.

We can now give the array a name of our choice. (Do not use a .)
        # storutil -c c1t0d0 -n "dragon_array"

Creating Lun’s

The disks are labelled on the front of the A1000 as controller number and disk number seperated by a comma eg. 1,0 1,2 and 2,0 etc, etc. We refer to the disks without using the comma. So the first disk on controller 1 is disk 10 and the 3rd disk on controller 2 is disk 23. we will use disks on both controllers when creating the mirrors. I am starting with the disks on each controller as viewed form the left. The next stage is to create the luns we require. In the below example I will configure a fully populated (12 disks) system which has 18Gb drives into the following sizes. Here we will use the raidutil command again.

        # raidutil -c controller -n lun_number -l  raid_type  -s  size  -g  disk_list

LUN 0   Size 8617mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across half of the first two disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 0 -l 1+0 -s 8617 -g 10,20

LUN 1   Size 8617mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across the second half of the first two disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 1 -l 1+0 -s 8617 -g 10,20

LUN 2   Size 8617mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across half of the next two disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 2 -l 1+0 -s 8617 -g 11,21

LUN 3   Size 8617mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across the second half of the next two disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 3 -l 1+0 -s 8617 -g 11,21

LUN 4   Size 34468mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across the next four disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 4 -l 1+0 -s 34468 -g 12,13,22,23

LUN 5   Size 17234mb of a stripped/mirror configuration across the next two disks.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 5 -l 1+0 -s 34468 -g 14,24

LUN 6   Size 17234mb of a non mirror configuration on the next disk.
               # raidutil -c c1t0d0 -n 6 -l 0 -s 34468 -g 15

This then leaves the disk 25 or disk 5 on the second controller free as a hot spare.
to set up this disk as a hot spare run
                # raidutil -h 25

Finishing off

We are now ready to reboot the system performing a reconfigure. When this is done we can format, partition, newfs and mount the disks in the normal way.

Other commands

The following is a list of possibly useful raid manager commands

  • rm6 (GUI interface)
  • drivutil (drive / lun management)
  • healtchk (helth check on a raid module
  • lad (list array devices)
  • logutil (log formatting program)
  • nvutil (edit / modify NVSRAM)
  • parityck (parity checker and repair)
  • rdacutil (redundency controller for failed bits and load balancing)
  • storutil (host and naming info)
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